Keeping Time | 2018

A series of objects, text and video as alternate studies of time.

 'Without some means of exact time keeping, industrial capitalism could never have developed and could not continue to exploit the workers, the clock represents an element of mechanical tyranny in the lives of modern men more potent than any individual exploiter or any other machine.'
-George Woodcock, The Tyranny of The Clock (1944)

Time has been imagined for centuries in different ways and we’ve developed multiple devices to measure it; a sundial, water-clock, church bells, the atomic clock, the domestic clock and the clock on our phones. However, time is also imagined by the body, and understood in terms of a fleeting present and the anticipation of a future. The pendulum lent us minutes and seconds through its repetition in continuous time. A body understands time via motion; motion informs us that time is passing, time has passed.

The body remembers and perceives time and its passage in an intuitive manner by generating a memory of duration, a memory that could be triggered by various senses. The clock occupies a second- ary function of confirmation of a presumed time. The memory of time is something the body constantly repro- duces. The clock that was made to aid a measurement and documentation of natural processes like the sunrise and sunset, reduces ones observation of the same. What are the markers of time in a world devoid of clocks?

24 hours of water
glass jar, customized stand, leaky faucet, tap water(2.8 l)

Waiting for snowfall, time-keeping   vinyl, mobile phone clock, weather channel Waiting for snowfall, time-keeping   vinyl, mobile phone clock, weather channel

Waiting for snowfall, time-keeping
vinyl, mobile phone clock, weather channel

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108 ̊ESE - 25 ̊WSW
digital video(3x), 33m 33s

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The length of daylight= 38600” (Autumnal Equinox)
graphite, paper, daylight